cloe gonzales
newsweek:And then there

newsweek:

And then there

nehgov:Freedom Rider Diane Nash with DC-area law students

nehgov:

Freedom Rider Diane Nash with DC-area law students

nhpublictv:

NOVA scienceNOW delves into some pretty heady stuff, examining magic and the brain, artificial intelligence, and magnetic mind control. Tonight at 6p. http://ow.ly/3QAdU

pulitzercenter:

Testing a new occasional feature here. Like most digital news types, I end my day with around 25 tabs open. Going forward, I’ll feature some of the most interesting or thought-provoking tabs I’ve been saving throughout the day*:

billboard:

defjamblr:

Unofficial, but still amazing. Thank you Billboard! (http://billboard.tumblr.com)

The pleasure is ours, Def Jam. Respect the old school.

zachlinder:

NBC Footage of 1973 Mets vs. Athletics World Series Introductions

capitalnewyork:Afterlife of a diva: Renata Scotto on aging, talent, tradition and why she quit | by Zachary Woolfe | Capital New YorkIn Renata Scotto’s house there is no piano. A decade after retiring,  following a career that lasted over 50 years and was one of the greatest  in twentieth-century opera, Scotto never sings, not even in the shower.  She keeps a single photograph in the house of herself in costume (as an  imperious Lady Macbeth at the Met), and she hangs it under the  staircase. With few exceptions, her friends aren’t fellow singers or  musicians. This is how she wants it.“You can ask a thousand people about the kind of person I  am,” she said last week over espresso and cookies in her living room in  Westchester, leaning back on her couch and laughing as she drew out the  “thousand” in the thick Italian accent that’s stayed with her through  decades of living in the United States. “I would never have a moment  where I said, ‘Ohh, I can’t sing anymore, it’s too bad because I can do  it better than so-and-so.’ I’m happy the way I am, and so interested in  so many things. I’ve never had a piano in my house. I’ve always kept it  separate.”

capitalnewyork:

Afterlife of a diva: Renata Scotto on aging, talent, tradition and why she quit | by Zachary Woolfe | Capital New York

In Renata Scotto’s house there is no piano. A decade after retiring, following a career that lasted over 50 years and was one of the greatest in twentieth-century opera, Scotto never sings, not even in the shower. She keeps a single photograph in the house of herself in costume (as an imperious Lady Macbeth at the Met), and she hangs it under the staircase. With few exceptions, her friends aren’t fellow singers or musicians. This is how she wants it.

“You can ask a thousand people about the kind of person I am,” she said last week over espresso and cookies in her living room in Westchester, leaning back on her couch and laughing as she drew out the “thousand” in the thick Italian accent that’s stayed with her through decades of living in the United States. “I would never have a moment where I said, ‘Ohh, I can’t sing anymore, it’s too bad because I can do it better than so-and-so.’ I’m happy the way I am, and so interested in so many things. I’ve never had a piano in my house. I’ve always kept it separate.”

There are suspect places
I must live in my lantern
T. S. Eliot, from

cameronmoll:

I’ll keep this brief. I didn’t have a chance to see any of the tributes yesterday (or the news reports for that matter), as I had prior commitments. So, I spent this morning reviewing the day’s events and related material.

Following are some of the highlights from my review.

The Story of…